Set your athletes up for success.

Strength training for triathlon is quickly becoming a mainstream method to help athletes get faster and prevent injury. Are you prepared to guide your athletes as they add strength to their training?

In this course, Coach Menachem Brodie will walk you through the basic physiology used in strength programs, and gets you ready to prescribe strength training in an effective and purposeful way. With over 10 years of experience helping athletes build strength the smart way, Coach Brodie is the perfect teacher to help you gain more knowledge so you have the ability to start building plans of your own.

More information about CEUs coming soon.

What you will learn

  • Athlete assessment

    Learn how to assess your athlete's strengths and weaknesses specific to triathletes.

  • Strength training adaptations

    Learn how triathletes will adapt to specific movements and exercises to develop sport-specific strength.

  • Build training plans

    Learn the building blocks of a good training plan so you can begin prescribing plans for your athletes.

Earn Continuing Education Units (CEUs)

Find the complete list of CEUs for this course here.

  • USA Triathlon

    7 CEUs

  • USA Cycling

    3 CEUs

  • National Strength Conditioning Association

    1.4 CEUs (Category D)

Become an expert in strength training for triathletes

Get started now

START THE COURSE

Meet your instructor

Course curriculum

  • 1
    Introduction and Welcome
    • Welcome to the course!
    • Strength is a key athletic ability
    • But the research says...
    • Triathlete struggles for weight training
    • The right muscles...
  • 2
    Strength Training Fundamentals for Triathlon
  • 3
    Lifetime Athlete Development
  • 4
    Athlete Assessment
  • 5
    Five Stages of Development
    • Introduction
    • 1. Anatomical adaptations
    • 2. Hypertrophy
    • 3. Max strength FREE PREVIEW
    • 4. Conversion to specific strength
    • 5. Maintenance
    • Desired results
    • What do your athletes need?
    • Quiz: Five Stages of Development
  • 6
    Movements
    • Introduction
    • 1. Push
    • 2. Pull
    • 3. Squat
    • 4. Hinge
    • 5. Press
    • 6. Rotary stability
    • Unstable movements
    • Quiz: Movements
  • 7
    Equipment
    • Introduction
    • Body weight
    • Bands
    • Kettlebells
    • Dumbells
    • Barbells
    • Freemotion and cable stacks
    • Quiz: Equipment
  • 8
    Posture and Breathing
    • Introduction
    • Pelvis and hips
    • Shoulders
    • Head
    • Breathing
    • Quiz: Posture and Breathing
  • 9
    Dynamic Warm-ups
    • Introduction
    • General and gross motor patterns
    • Focused movements
    • Review
    • Quiz: Dynamic Warm-Ups
  • 10
    Special Populations
    • Postpartum women
    • Injured athletes
    • Annual training plans for special populations
    • Quiz: Special Populations
  • 11
    Programming
    • Introduction
    • Strength training timing
    • Programming for different distances
    • Measurement
    • Adjusting for fatigue
    • Increasing difficulty
    • KISS to success
    • How many sets, bro?
    • Training year breakdown
    • Sample program (part 1)
    • Sample program (part 2)
    • Course wrap-up
    • Quiz: Programming
    • Course Resources

What others are saying about the course

  • Strength Training for Triathletes

    Ashley Wilkinson

    Overall, I thought this was a good course. There were times I thought Coach Brodie went off on a tangent or two and got a little off script, but he would bring his thoughts back and relate them to the topic on hand. I would've liked to have seen ...

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    Overall, I thought this was a good course. There were times I thought Coach Brodie went off on a tangent or two and got a little off script, but he would bring his thoughts back and relate them to the topic on hand. I would've liked to have seen some more examples of exercises in the actual presentation (although there were a good number in the course resources). The information was presented clearly. And I will always remember, "Joint position dictates muscle function."

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